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Thread: Where did your production knowledge come from?

  1. #1


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    Default Where did your production knowledge come from?

    That愀 a question i悲 like to know. How many of you studied music production? That means who introduced you to the secrets how to make music?... what is MIDI, how to use it, how to operate Sampler, Sequencer, Cubase, Pro-Tools etc.?

    Are you self tought? or did any friends teach you how to use, connect your equipment??

    Thanks for the answer, i am new to music production - profi
    I just used simple products like Fruity Loops, Music 2000 etc.
    I got lately Reason 2 but i don愒 know what the 中中 i can make with it, i don愒 even know how to generate new sounds etc :-) to get something from it and i hate manuals :-)

  2. #2


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    Ok, good question.

    First off, a friend of mine who was into music allowed me to borrow his Yamaha DX-100 once, in 1988. I learned how to program it and went on to create nearly 30 banks of sounds for it, including the trademark Synthetik FM kick drum sound you hear in alot of my newer material. I eventually bought a Korg Poly-800 II for about $200 and thereby entered the world of analog synthesis.

    I started out on an Alesis MMT-8 sequencer, and eventually moved on to an Atari ST running Steinberg-12 MIDI software. I am very computer literate so I taught myself pretty much all I needed to know about it.

    As far as mixing and getting levels right, I am still very much a novice at it, but having the ears of people in this scene (ESPECIALLY people like Brian Hazard, David Friede, and Aidan from ESH) really helps alot. These people are true professionals, and can pick out problems in my mixes that I didn't even know were there.

  3. #3


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    A friend of mine let me borrow an old Prophet1 analogue.
    I sat there for a day straight just tweaking the knobs and making 中中ed up sounds. From then on I was hooked.
    Started buying gear in pawnshops and at yardsales slowly building a studio, meanwhile experimenting with the machines I had alone and in combination. Eventually I had a functional rig and started making proper songs, but that experimental mindset from having to make do has remained and continues to shape what I make.
    !J!
    http://www.endif.org
    http://thirdwavecollective.com

  4. #4


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    Some, I got in high school. I was the only computer nerd who spent that much time in the music department, so I became the guy they tasked with learning how to make all the MIDI gear and comptuers work. They hadned me about 3 years worth of back issues of electronic musician, a couple of books by craig anderton, and said "here. Go to it."

    In college I was just involved in multimedia development. Learned a lot doing that.

    Learned a lot from Ned Kirby, too.

    Read a lot of books and magazines and websites.

    Check "Futureproducers.com" fairly regularly.

    Study the manuals for my gear. Join mailing lists.

    Tweak obsessively. Stop leaving my basement. Turn my back on hope and love.

    You know, the usual.
    Eric Oehler
    wonko@nulldevice.com
    www.nulldevice.com

  5. #5
    Lead ElectroGardener cliffwalk's Avatar
    Joined
    February 22nd, 2002
    Age
    43
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    I leech my knowledge from others.

    I read a lot.

    Lots of computer experience.

    Did I mention that OTHER PEOPLE are important? Well, they are. I ask a lot of questions and read other people's questions.

    There's something to be said about just "doing it". You learn a lot that way.

    Dave
    If you\'re reading this, you have a tiny penis.

  6. #6


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    Since I am an older fart, I started out messing around with synths back in the 70's as a teen. I would go to the music stores and drive the salesmen crazy with my knob twiddling behaviour. But since they also noticed that I was very careful with their equipment, they didn't actually mind that much, although the headphones magically appeared upon each of my visits. But I'll never forget the first time I played on a mini moog or the advent of the Prophet 5. In college, I became the synth programmer guy and got the chance to develope my sound sculpting skills a bit more on equipment I couldn't possibly afford, including some large modulars (hey... who says that tax dollars can't be spent wisely!). It was a hell of a lot of fun and one sweet way to earn extra credits!

    Most of my production knowledge evolved over time. Since my late teens I've been a studio musician, so I have observed some very diverse studio engineers in action. Every time something piqued my interest I would find out "how the heck did you do that?". In the 80's I began to get a bit of my own recording stuff. Experimenting on my own and reading books and watching videos were even more valuable. One set of videos that I highly recommend is the "Shaping Your Sound" series. Anyone that wants to get good footing on recording, mixing, and producing would benefit greatly from these. I haven't seen them advertised for a while, hopefully they're still around.

    By the way...I highly recommend reading the Reason Manual as well as joining one of the public forums for it. There are some really strange things you can do with Reason that are not apparent until you start messing around with some of the "dark secrets" hidden within it.
    Dave
    www.mp3.com/davidsgravenimage

  7. #7


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    Knowledge comes from listening to other pro cds, replicating techniques, and reading magazines.
    www.myspace.com/pswk
    www.popstarwhokills.com (ElectroRock)
    www.myspace.com/youngjoon (Breaks)
    www.myspace.com/grep (IDM)
    www.myspace.com/requiemnoise (Industrial)

    \"There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.\"
    - Pablo Picasso

    \"The world only goes round by misunderstanding.\"
    - Charles Baudelaire

    \"It is quality, not quantity.\"

    \"why is it feel like a greatful dead show here? like that hippe that constantly talks about one band and how they changed their lives.\"

    PLEASE NO MORE \"I am a robot music.\" You are not a robot. Learn to program better like human beings.\"

    Electro is House music. If you don\'t like House music, please don\'t put down Electro, because it is trendy to say it. It might suprise you that Electro and House music were invented by Gay Black Americans in the mid 80s. They weren\'t invented by the beatless people who like to coin new trendy phrases.

    I am so tired of \"I want to be Depeche Mode or Erasure for the last 25 years.\" I hope I am not the only one. 25 years is a quarter of century and about a 1/3 of human life. If a person spends a 1/3 of his or her life having the same tastes, I don\'t know if that person acquired enough information to have an interesting life or has a problem understanding he or she is no longer a teenager.

    So called artists who never change, why do you call yourself an artist again?

  8. #8


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    An excellent Reason forum: www.reasonfreaks.com
    Dave
    www.mp3.com/davidsgravenimage

  9. #9


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    Oh yes, mailing lists and forums, all forms of research, absolutely.
    Digital Hell and Analogue Heaven, Musicmachines, all helped speed me along the path to synth-nerdage, and others continue to sustain.
    !J!
    http://www.endif.org
    http://thirdwavecollective.com

  10. #10


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    I spent some time in a studio.

    I read way too much.

    I do lots of cover songs in which I try to emulate techniques I've heard in other recordings.

    I write and produce songs as often as possible.

    I'm about to go to school for it.

    -Mark
    www.djintrovert.com

  11. #11
    Lead ElectroGardener cliffwalk's Avatar
    Joined
    February 22nd, 2002
    Age
    43
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    I've learned a ton in the past year.

    Most of that learning has been guided by a small group of individuals that I correspond with regularly in connection with this site and a few mailing lists.

    The key to learning is to realize that other people will do what books can't do: give you their perspective on the complicated to make the complicated easier and make what you've read make even more sense by backing it up with a practical explaination.

    Just remember how important other people are to the process whether you're pursuing this as a career or if you're like me... a hobbyist.

    The same is true for the music end of things, frankly. I came into this with a 4 year degree (well, nearly) in Music Composition with a Performance Certificate and 4 years of semi-professional Jazz performance experience--not to mention hours of singing experience doing classical/opera. I still needed endless amounts of advice on making some transitions to find the sound I wanted. Not doable without advice.

    People are important. Don't try and do it all on your own. You'll fail AND people wont like you

    Dave


    Dave
    If you\'re reading this, you have a tiny penis.

  12. #12


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    Well, I started all alone, without magazines, without anything.

    we don't had much info here in Brazil about that until today, and more than 15 years ago was very worst.

    I tryed to imagine how to they (the bands that I like) make his music, and try something similar with very poor knowlege and gears.

    Until 1994 all that I done was by pure feeling, and without ANY theory. And all that I programmed was made and created by myself. (how and where to programming I mean)

    In 1994 I start to learn music/keyboard with a home professor, who also introduced me to MIDI.

    But I already had created my way of do music, and I never used MIDI, and I until tryed, but I figured that I don't need and I don't used MIDI anymore until nowdays.

    Yeah, I'm crazy, I know! don't try to follow me!

    And in 1997 with Internet I met many musicians on the net, university, etc, that I learn and teach a lot of techniques.
    Also got many manuals, tutorials that I never had access here.

    I live here in a total different reality than you there, I can't buy a keyboard here aside pay more than 5x the price that you buy out there, reaching until 10x the price out there.

    This year, I studied at Home Studio, a music school here in Rio that I learned MANY things that I already using, but never without 100% sure of what I'm was doing, what now I know where I putting my steps.

    I can say also thank you to Kurt Harland that help me a lot in the beginning. And recently I learned many things with Brian Hazard...

    I'm always learning... and always will be!

    Freddy

  13. #13


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    practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice.

    you get the picture

  14. #14


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    thanks a lot for your advice, i惻l definitely check mentioned www

    The problem is i read a lot too but none of my friends are musical so nobody can show me exactly what to do.

    For example i have got MIDI keyboard and MIDI cable but when i connect it to my computer and play or try to operate it with program nothing happens, it愀 dead, silent etc.

    So my solution is simple when i want to play melody i connect my keyboard through headphones jack and suddenly i can record it real-time live to my soundforge :-)

    Other problem is why the hell are Protools, Cubase so complicated?? You know i use sequencers like Fruity-Loops and especially Music 2000, i can make music that sounds real pro with it, i惻l post some samples, i have a huge collection of wav-single notes,sounds that i load into my Music 2000 and that is, i put live melody from my headphones over it and it sounds cool :-)

    When i see studios with thousand buttons and cables i don愒 understand why cause in the music usually i don愒 hear that.

    The thing i am missing most is what to do with MIDI and the lack of synths because i need some arrpegiators that are major part of syhthpop songs and make song much cooler. And the other problem of course is when i will have how to connect it and what button to push in Reason etc :-) Hope i惻l find some musical friend...

  15. #15


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    ProTools, Logic, Cubase - they're all complicated for one reason: Flexibility.

    You might be completely happy with using FLStudio for recording and producing, but for people who don't work that way, or who are required to work with instruments that don't ledn themselves to that sort of technique, or who have lots and lots of outboard gear, you need a system that can accomodate the various styles of production and songwriting. They're also complicated so they can handle all the different kinds of hardware and audio formats, work with different mixing boards, studio setups, effects, etc etc etc.

    If you see a studio with a thousand buttons and you don't hear a thousand buttons being pushed, then you're hearing an engineer who knows how to do his job right. All the myriad tweaks, edits, changes, punch-ins, punch-outs should be transparent to the listener.
    Eric Oehler
    wonko@nulldevice.com
    www.nulldevice.com

  16. #16


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    Spending hour upon hour in my bandmate's studio.

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